FAED PhD CEDS-S

Beth Hartman McGilley

Licensed Clinical Psychologist

Beth Hartman McGilley, Ph.D., FAED, CEDS, is a psychologist in private practice, specializing in the treatment of eating and related disorders, body image, athletes, trauma, and grief. A Fellow of the Academy for Eating Disorders (AED), and a Certified Eating Disorders Specialist and Supervisor, she has practiced for over 35 years, writing, lecturing, supervising, directing an inpatient eating disorders program and providing individual, family and group therapy.  She has presented, edited, and published extensively in the field of eating disorders, including being a former journal editor for Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention, and co-editor for the book: Treatment of Eating Disorders: Bridging the Research/Practice Gap. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. McGilley has been a chair or member of numerous committees for the Academy for Eating Disorders since its inception, a member of the Renfrew Conference Committee and a core curriculum teacher for IAEDP certification students. Dr. McGilley also specializes in applications of sports psychology and performance enhancement techniques for athletes at all levels of competition. She was the sports psychology consultant for the Wichita State University Women’s Basketball team from 2005-2008. She was the co-founder and co-chair of the Association for Applied Sports Psychology (AASP) Eating Disorders Special Interest Group from 2007-2012.  Dr. McGilley co-founded and for 12 years served as the President of the Healing Path Foundation, a nonprofit foundation dedicated to the prevention and treatment of eating disorders in Kansas. She was a 2008 graduate of the Kansas Health Foundation Leadership Fellows Training program. Her hobbies include competitive cycling, hiking, writing, and time with her therapy dog, Wheeler the Healer.

Presentation Healers Helping Healers

This presentation will address the topic of recovered professionals in the field of eating disorders, what we know about their prevalence, the personal and professional issues they uniquely face given their recovered status, and how we can best address their needs when their recovery status is challenged.